Davis-Woodland Water Supply Project

By improving the water supply for the communities of Davis and Woodland, including the University of California at Davis, the Davis-Woodland Water Supply Project will meet all water needs through 2040.


As one of the few new intakes to be successfully permitted and installed on the Sacramento River, this project provides net environmental benefit through salmonid protection, while ensuring a safe and reliable water supply for the City of Davis.

Jim O'Toole
ESA Water Practice Leader
Why does this project matter?

This project led to the opportunity to conjoin the Reclamation District (RD) 2035 fish screen project and the Davis Woodland Water Supply Project, resulting in net environmental benefits—improving water quality for municipal uses while also protecting migrating salmonids. The proposed facilities will include a new in-river diversion structure on the Sacramento River, a new water treatment plant, and conveyance and distribution pipelines to serve the cities of Davis and Woodland as well as UC Davis.

What is ESA doing to help?

ESA prepared the environmental impact report that evaluated the impacts of constructing facilities and pipelines to divert up to 46,000 acre-feet of water per year from the Sacramento River.

We oversaw studies analyzing potential changes to the hydrology and water quality of the Sacramento River and Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta using CALSIM II and DSM2 computer models. Our team evaluated the potential effects of water diversion on fish and aquatic species, and treatment facility project impacts to wetlands, special-status vegetation, wildlife species, and cultural resources. ESA prepared documentation in compliance with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 404 permit process, National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), and Section 7 of the Endangered Species Act.

Additional studies addressed the cumulative and growth-inducing effects within each partner's service area, along with an assessment of groundwater resources, public health risk, and potential effects on other legal water users.


News & Ideas